July 23, 2020

6 Models of Co-Teaching

Co-Teaching is a rewarding, yet challenging experience. Co-teachers need to plan and communicate regularly, and consideration of teaching models will most likely become regular topics.



There are 6 basic models of co-teaching to consider when planning your lessons.

1. One Teach and One Observe

One teacher teaches while the other teacher collects data. The data collected can be academic or behavior, formal or informal. One type of data that I previously asked my co-teachers to collect centered around my interaction with the students. I wanted to know how many times I called on each student during a particular lesson and whether or not they had raised their hands before being called on. This was informal data collection but helped me recognize which students needed more engagement or sharing opportunities and of course, which students had no trouble at all with class participation.

2. One Teach and One Assist

One teacher teaches while the other teacher provides individual assistance during the lesson. Basically, one teacher is leading the lesson while the other walks around and helps any student who may be confused or needs additional direction.

3. Parallel Teaching

The class is divided into 2 groups (possibly based on data) and each teacher teaches a group at the same time.

4. Station Teaching

Both teachers teach in small groups, and the students rotate through stations that include meetings with the teachers. My personal favorite! If you group students into 4 groups, they can rotate around the room with 2 teacher-directed stations and 2 more independent stations. The teacher stations can be different parts of a lesson and students would visit both of your stations. Alternatively, the teacher stations could be the same and students would visit with just one of you. Students love this form of instruction (as do many administrators in my experience!) This type of teaching allows for teacher and student engagement while allowing for creativity and independence. Station teaching is perfect for incorporating those fun ideas found on Pinterest and TpT!

5. Alternative Teaching

One teacher takes a small group aside during a lesson for intense or remedial instruction. This type of model works well when you have a small group of struggling students and they cannot move on with content until they grasp certain concepts. Buyer beware though...often students who are not struggling will ask to sit at the table! How you handle this is up to you, but sometimes a student may just need a little TLC so if there is room at the table...

6. Team Teaching

Both teachers teach all the students in a whole group instruction format. Some concepts are just better taught with the two of you interacting back and forth in complementary roles. This model almost feels like a theatrical performance and can really be fun and effective. Students like to pay attention to the interaction between the adults and the adlib in the lesson. Again...buyer beware...students have been known to use this type of lesson to get you sidetracked and off-topic!


You can choose different models during the day to keep the variety and meet the needs of your students. Flexibility is important too. A lesson that begins with One Teach and One Assist may evolve into Alternative Teaching if you observe that some students are in need of greater support.

Working with a co-teacher and need a place to start? Check out this Co-Teaching Guide that includes plenty of helpful printables:
 Co-teaching

Have you used any of these co-teaching models? Which models have worked out the best?



July 12, 2020

4th Grade Writing Prompts and Ideas

4th Grade curriculum usually includes 4 types of writing.

This chart summarizes expository, descriptive, persuasive, and narrative writing. It can be used as a reference and get you started with your lessons.


Does your writing curriculum need supplements?

Kids love this Opinion Writing resource that may help with your persuasive writing goals:

 opinion-writing

Once students are interacting again, you can try a fun way to distribute the opinion writing prompts!
1. Place each prompt in a separate envelope. Do not seal.
2. Have students stand up.
3. Distribute one envelope to each student. Spread out the extra envelopes on a table.
4. Students look at their prompt but keep it a secret.
5. If the student wants to keep their prompt, they sit down with it.
6. If a student does not want the prompt, they may EITHER trade with a classmate or swap at the table.
7. Repeat step 6 one more time or for as long as your patience allows!
8. Students use an organizer and begin writing.


Need just a graphic organizer for your own topics? Check out this print and go best seller for only $1.00!

 personal-narrative

Have you ever thought about having pen pals? Pen pal letter exchange can help students practice their writing skills. Check out this older post where I talk about how I teamed up with a teacher in California for a pen pal experience.    


Once you team up with another teacher, you may want to use this friendly letter resource to get your kids started:

 friendly-letter-writing

Choice boards are all the rage and writing is no exception! Kids and teachers love these writing choice boards that can be used throughout the school year. One teacher states: "I used this during writers workshop. The kids really loved the variety of prompts and it was easy to implement every month."

 writing-prompts


What motivates your students to write? Feel free to respond in the comments below!